Hey there! I'm a twenty-something writer/filmmaker/gamer from Cork, Ireland. Currently studying English & History at UCC.

theroyaltenenblarghs:

Gonna paint your wagon
 Gonna paint it fine
 Gonna use oil-based paint
 ‘Cos the wood is pine.

theroyaltenenblarghs:

Gonna paint your wagon

Gonna paint it fine

 Gonna use oil-based paint

‘Cos the wood is pine.

Sometimes i am Bob, sometimes i am Linda.

(Source: tinarannosaurus)

"They can keep their heaven. When I die, I’d sooner go to Middle-Earth." ― George R.R. Martin

(Source: faramircaptainofgondor)

donutsornonuts:

We are gathered here today because SOMEBODY *glares at coffin* couldn’t stay alive.

comicsalliance:

DO YOU KNOW WHAT YOUR CHILDREN ARE? MUTANTS AS QUEER PARIAHS [MUTANT & PROUD PART II]
By Andrew Wheeler
Mutants as a metaphor for real minority groups are an awkward fit for a number of reasons. First of all, mutants are actually dangerous. Second, a lot of mutants have good cause to reject their identity. Third, and perhaps crucially, mutants don’t have a shared culture like real minority groups.
Of course, people have said all of those things about LGBT people as well. In the second of three Pride Month essays exploring mutants as a metaphor for queer identity, I’ll look at how mutants are actually a perfect metaphor for the sort of dangerous myths used to marginalize LGBT people.
The idea of legislation to monitor or control mutants is a long-running theme in Marvel’s X-Men titles. The overturning of the Mutant Control Act triggered the events of Days of Future Past. Mutant registration was the cover under which the first X-Factor team operated, and the reason for the creation of Freedom Force. Its tendrils can even be felt in the Superhuman Registration Act that sparked the Civil War storyline of 2006.
In 1987, Marvel ran fake ads in its books in support of the Mutant Registration Act — though they were actually intended to promote its upcoming Fall Of The Mutants storyline. The ads read; “It’s 1987. Do You Know What Your Children Are?” One of the children featured was Franklin Richards, a member of Power Pack and the mutant son of the Fantastic Four’s Reed and Sue Richards, with the word “MUTIE” scrawled across his face.
I wasn’t at the right age back then to worry if my parents knew what their child was. I didn’t yet know what I was. I was old enough to be terrified of the possibility that I might turn out gay, but I didn’t know that I would. It was only years later that I would look back at those ads with the disquieted realization that the fear they were addressing was my parents’ fear.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

DO YOU KNOW WHAT YOUR CHILDREN ARE? MUTANTS AS QUEER PARIAHS [MUTANT & PROUD PART II]

By Andrew Wheeler

Mutants as a metaphor for real minority groups are an awkward fit for a number of reasons. First of all, mutants are actually dangerous. Second, a lot of mutants have good cause to reject their identity. Third, and perhaps crucially, mutants don’t have a shared culture like real minority groups.

Of course, people have said all of those things about LGBT people as well. In the second of three Pride Month essays exploring mutants as a metaphor for queer identity, I’ll look at how mutants are actually a perfect metaphor for the sort of dangerous myths used to marginalize LGBT people.

The idea of legislation to monitor or control mutants is a long-running theme in Marvel’s X-Men titles. The overturning of the Mutant Control Act triggered the events of Days of Future Past. Mutant registration was the cover under which the first X-Factor team operated, and the reason for the creation of Freedom Force. Its tendrils can even be felt in the Superhuman Registration Act that sparked the Civil War storyline of 2006.

In 1987, Marvel ran fake ads in its books in support of the Mutant Registration Act — though they were actually intended to promote its upcoming Fall Of The Mutants storyline. The ads read; “It’s 1987. Do You Know What Your Children Are?” One of the children featured was Franklin Richards, a member of Power Pack and the mutant son of the Fantastic Four’s Reed and Sue Richards, with the word “MUTIE” scrawled across his face.

I wasn’t at the right age back then to worry if my parents knew what their child was. I didn’t yet know what I was. I was old enough to be terrified of the possibility that I might turn out gay, but I didn’t know that I would. It was only years later that I would look back at those ads with the disquieted realization that the fear they were addressing was my parents’ fear.

READ MORE

i-like-your-french-shoes:

whatismgmt:

Caught my mom dancing to walcott with my parrot omg

Vampire Weekend needs to see this

awwww-cute:

Told him to get off the top of the car, he did this

awwww-cute:

Told him to get off the top of the car, he did this

One of the best out takes from any television show, ever. 

(Source: prekrasnoe-mngnovenie)

towongfoo:

If I dont respond to your insult it means what i wanted to say was too mean and I decided to let you live

(Source: menthuthuyoupi)

gingersofficial:

I like for my sister to start her day with new knowledge to help her get up and on her way

gingersofficial:

I like for my sister to start her day with new knowledge to help her get up and on her way